Chocolate and Cuckoo Clocks: The Essential Alan ...

Edited by his children, Giles and Victoria, Chocolate and Cuckoo Clocks is an anthology of writing from the former editor of Punch and Radio 4 national treasure Alan Coren, who died in October 2007. In a prolific forty-year career Alan Coren wrote for The Times, Observer, Tatler, Daily Mail, Mail on Sunday, Listener, Punch and

Edited by his children, Giles and Victoria, and Cuckoo Clocks is an anthology of writing from the former editor of Punch and 4 national treasure , who died in October 2007. In a prolific forty-year career Alan wrote for The Times, Observer, Tatler, Daily Mail, Mail on Sunday, Listener, Punch and the New Yorker, and published over 20 books including The Sanity Inspector, Golfing for Cats and The Collected Bulletins of Idi Amin (he turned down an invitation from Amin to visit Uganda saying, ‘I’ll probably end up as a sandwich’). Even twenty years ago he estimated that he had published six million words, or ten copies of War and Peace. This anthology draws together the best of ’s previously published material as well as new unpublished autobiographical material. was one of Britain’s most prolific and now much-missed humourists, finding the comedy of life all around him and rendering it, hilariously and compellingly, in polished and witty prose which will be eagerly devoured by his loyal fanbase.Edited by his children, Giles and Victoria, and Cuckoo Clocks is an anthology of writing from the former editor of Punch and Radio 4 national treasure Alan Coren, who died in October 2007. In a prolific forty-year career Alan Coren wrote for The Times, Observer, Tatler, Daily Mail, Mail on Sunday, Listener, Punch and the New Yorker, and published over 20 books including The Sanity Inspector, Golfing for Cats and The Collected Bulletins of Idi Amin (he turned down an invitation from Amin to visit Uganda saying, ‘I’ll probably end up as a sandwich’). Even twenty years ago he estimated that he had published six million words, or ten copies of War and Peace. This anthology draws together the best of Coren’s previously published material as well as new unpublished autobiographical material. Coren was one of Britain’s most prolific and now much-missed humourists, finding the comedy of life all around him and rendering it, hilariously and compellingly, in polished and witty prose which will be eagerly devoured by his loyal fanbase.

Comments

Anonymous says:

I am helpless with laughter 🙂 No, I’m not just helpless with laughter – I am apoplectic with it! I have to take time out from reading Alen Coren just to get my breath back. If laughter is the best medicine, this book is worth several hundredweight of happy pills. I can remember reading “The Unnatural History of Selborne” once in the dentist’s waiting room and I can issue this health warning: “Reading Alan Coren in public can seriously damage your gravitas!” Five stars are definitely too little to award to this genius of…

Anonymous says:

Funniest Man Ever? A good collection of Alan Coren work, compiled by his children. As it is a compilation, and obviously to their taste, it misses some of the pieces that I thought hilarious, such as the food additive piece, “Those Disturbing Additives” but a good compilation all the same.There are some of the Idi Amin pieces, which are interesting in that in these politically correct times they probably would not have been allowed in print.Indeed the whole book carries a superb patina of the…

Anonymous says:

The book is not long enough! Brilliant selection of some of Alan Coren’s best stories, many previously published in Punch. Coren was of course arguably the best comedy writer of the late 20th Century and there are very few indeed who come even close to equalling his abilities. If you are new to Coren then this collection is an excellent introduction to his works. If you are already a fan of Coren then this book reminds you of just why he is so brilliant. My only criticism of this collection is that it is so short, albeit…

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